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A Georgian Sporting Clays Tournament

Past and future planned - events/ outings/ training sessions/ offline meets/ camps/ matches etc.
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Vikram
Posts: 4166
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2006 6:14 am
Location: Tbilisi,Georgia

Re: A Georgian Sporting Clays Tournament

Postby Vikram » Thu Jul 04, 2013 12:36 am

Gents, thanks again for letting me know that you liked it.

Katana, another historical tidbit. Thank you.

Moin. wrote:How strict are the gun laws in Georgia and how expensive is indulging in shooting sports.


Moin,

Gun laws are quite reasonable here. If you are a citizen, all you need is your national ID, a certificate from your doctor that you are physically and mentally fit and an application to the police who will process it in less than a week.. Then buy the guns you want and simply register them. There is no limit on the number of guns you can buy. They recently introduced a requirement that arms and ammunition must not be stored in such a way that they are accessible to children.

In my case, i.e. non-citizens, the procedure is the same but they need a no objection certificate from the concerned embassy. That means that the concerned embassy should state that they have no objection to being issued a firearm licence in Georgia.

Re prices, everything is imported here and some EU countries still consider this country as a conflict zone, owning to a border dispute with Russia, and have some restrictions placed on arms export. That and for a few other reasons, prices tend to be higher than say what one would pay in UK or any other comparable EU country. BTW, Georgia is not in EU. The prices are, however, a lot lower than India. A nice CZ-75 in used but excellent condition can be had for a $1000, steep compared to USA but peanuts compared to India. A Glock for $1300+. But, there are a lot cheaper options in the form of Turkish guns and pistols.

One could get a TT or a Makarov pistol for say about Rs. 25,000.


One could buy Dragunov or SKS but full-autos are not allowed.

12 bore cartridges - cheaper ones tend to be around Rs.15/-, Eley Trap/Skeet loads at around Rs. 20/- and the expensive ones around Rs.30+. Rifle cartridges are steep. For example a .308 cartridge costs about Rs.75+. But other rifle cartridges can cost a pretty penny.

Primers, powders, brass- all can be bought easily.

Hope that gives some information.


Best-
Vikram


It ain’t over ’til it’s over! "Rocky,Rocky,Rocky....."

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brihacharan
Posts: 3112
Joined: Fri Jan 22, 2010 3:33 pm
Location: mumbai

Re: A Georgian Sporting Clays Tournament

Postby brihacharan » Thu Jul 04, 2013 11:50 am

Gurjars & Georgians

The origins of the Gurjars are uncertain. The Gurjara clan appeared in northern India about the time of the Huna invasions of northern India. Some scholars, such as V. A. Smith, believed that the Gujjars were foreign immigrants, possibly a branch of Hephthalites (“White Huns”). D. B. Bhandarkar (1875-1950) believed that Gujars came into India with the Hunas, and the name of the tribe was Sanskritized to “Gurjara”. He also believed that several places in Central Asia, such as “Gurjistan”, are named after the Gujars and that the reminiscences of Gujar migration is preserved in these names. General Cunningham identified the Gujjars with Yuezhi or Tocharians.

In the past, Gujjars have also been hypothesized to be descended from the nomadic Khazar tribes, although the history of Khazars shows an entirely different politico-culture ethos. This argument is chiefly based on the assumption that the word “Gujjar” is derived from the word “Khazar”; the Indo-Aryan languages lacked the sounds “kh” and “z”, converting them respectively into “g” and “j”. In Gazetteer of Bombay Presidency, the British civil servant James M. Campbell identified Gujars with Khazars.

Some Gujjars also claim that the Gujjar caste is related to the Chechens and the Georgians, and argue that Georgia was traditionally called “Gujaristan” actually Gorjestan. The word “Georgia” derived from the Arabic and Persian word Gurj, and not Gujjar or Gurjar.

Gujjar rulers

According to some historical accounts, the kingdom with capital at Bhinmal or Srimal was established by the Gujjars. A minor kingdom of Bharuch was the offshoot of this Kingdom. In 640-41 CE, the Chinese traveller Xuanzang (Hieun Tsang) described the kingdoms of Su-la-cha (identified with Saurashtra) and Kiu-che-lo (identified with Gurjara) in his writings. He stated that the Gurjaras ruled a rich and populous kingdom with capital at Bhinmal (Pilo-mo-lo). According to his expositor, M. Vivien de St. Martin, Su-la-cha represents the modern Gujarat, and Kiu-che-lo (Gurjjara), “the country of the Gujars”, represents the region between between Anhilwara and the Indus River.
Ref: Gujjar Tribe > rashidfaridi.wordpress.com/2008/05/28/gujjar-tribe/

Isn’t it truly amazing that an “Invisible Thread” connects all of us, no matter to what part of the world we come from! The theory of “SIX Degrees of Separation” can neither be challenged nor contested!!!

Long Live Humanity & Brotherhood amongst Men (of-course Women too!!!)

Briha



ngrewal
Posts: 2920
Joined: Wed May 31, 2006 7:28 pm
Location: US

Re: A Georgian Sporting Clays Tournament

Postby ngrewal » Thu Jul 04, 2013 6:52 pm

Nice outing Vikram now where is your shotgun or pistol?
I had a colleague who was russian but assimilated in Georgia nice guy...only regret was Stalin the best known Georgian
Cheers



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Moin.
Poster of the Month - Sep '11 & Apr '13
Poster of the Month - Sep '11 & Apr '13
Posts: 1718
Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 11:10 am
Location: Gujrat

Re: A Georgian Sporting Clays Tournament

Postby Moin. » Thu Jul 04, 2013 10:10 pm

Vikram wrote:Gents, thanks again for letting me know that you liked it.

Katana, another historical tidbit. Thank you.

Moin. wrote:How strict are the gun laws in Georgia and how expensive is indulging in shooting sports.


Moin,

Gun laws are quite reasonable here. If you are a citizen, all you need is your national ID, a certificate from your doctor that you are physically and mentally fit and an application to the police who will process it in less than a week.. Then buy the guns you want and simply register them. There is no limit on the number of guns you can buy. They recently introduced a requirement that arms and ammunition must not be stored in such a way that they are accessible to children.

In my case, i.e. non-citizens, the procedure is the same but they need a no objection certificate from the concerned embassy. That means that the concerned embassy should state that they have no objection to being issued a firearm licence in Georgia.

Re prices, everything is imported here and some EU countries still consider this country as a conflict zone, owning to a border dispute with Russia, and have some restrictions placed on arms export. That and for a few other reasons, prices tend to be higher than say what one would pay in UK or any other comparable EU country. BTW, Georgia is not in EU. The prices are, however, a lot lower than India. A nice CZ-75 in used but excellent condition can be had for a $1000, steep compared to USA but peanuts compared to India. A Glock for $1300+. But, there are a lot cheaper options in the form of Turkish guns and pistols.

One could get a TT or a Makarov pistol for say about Rs. 25,000.


One could buy Dragunov or SKS but full-autos are not allowed.

12 bore cartridges - cheaper ones tend to be around Rs.15/-, Eley Trap/Skeet loads at around Rs. 20/- and the expensive ones around Rs.30+. Rifle cartridges are steep. For example a .308 cartridge costs about Rs.75+. But other rifle cartridges can cost a pretty penny.

Primers, powders, brass- all can be bought easily.

Hope that gives some information.


Best-
Vikram


Thank you Vikram. Good to know. Where's your pic by the way :mrgreen: My thread still awaits :)

Regards
Moin.


In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer. Camus


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