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The killing of Cecil, the beloved lion!

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dr.jayakumar
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Re: The killing of Cecil, the beloved lion!

Postby dr.jayakumar » Thu Oct 15, 2015 9:44 am

xl_target wrote:Unless you're a pure vegetarian, you can't really belittle hunting. Still, even vegetarians take life.

If you buy your meat at a supermarket, the only difference between you and a hunter is that the hunter kills his own meat. You on the other hand have someone else kill your animals for you. Meat isn't grown in vats, harvested, packaged and sold in a market. Someone kills the animal, often in horrible slaughterhouse conditions. Not to mention the leather for you shoes, belts and wallets. Someone kills an animal to get those products. What's the difference?

In the USA, one of the wealthiest countries on this earth, no one needs to hunt. You can buy pretty much every animal byproduct neatly packaged somewhere. Yet very large numbers of people hunt. Guess what? The fees from hunting and fishing licences, tax from sales of ammo and firearms pays for arguably the best National, State and local parks on the planet. The treehuggers who visit there, pay a pittance to gain entry and partake in this largess. These fees (billions of dollars) pay for the rangers that staff and run these parks and the amenities that exist there. These terrorists, as you call them, carry the freight for conservation, not the hippies who run around in the woods chanting to the spirits. People hunt because they enjoy it, maybe obeying some primal instinct handed down in their genes from the dawn of mankind.

If you can ever see some of the old 1950's through the 1970's videos of the fabled game sanctuaries in Africa, you will see game like in no other place on earth. Today, there is nowhere near anything like that. For example, Kenya has banned hunting in its game sanctuaries and the money has gradually dried up. Due to lack of resources, today, poachers run rampant and uncontrolled through many of those parks. While they still have a lot of game, many of Africa's parks today are mere shadows of what they were. Thousands of camera wielding tourists still tour those sanctuaries, yet the money is nowhere near what it used to be, to the detriment of those animals.

Conservation is a science and has precious little to do with feelings. Only by rigid applications of scientific conservation principles will the game on this earth be preserved. Hunting, along with culling is one tool in the conservationists toolbox. Culling is an expense that pays no money into conservation coffers, hunting does. I shudder at the lack of education of today's youth, and worry about the future of this planet; where feelings are more important the scientific truth.

you are obsolutly right..
i agree with you cent percent
regards
dr.jk



pradeep2374
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Re: The killing of Cecil, the beloved lion!

Postby pradeep2374 » Thu Oct 15, 2015 11:10 am

I agree to all your views. When you are facing a Lion, it's a matter of who kills first, the lion or you. Again, taking about all these are we really concerned about the animal or our own belief system? In India, animals are more revered than humans. Is life of an animal more precious than a human??
Let's act humanely to humans before practising it on animals.


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xl_target
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Re: The killing of Cecil, the beloved lion!

Postby xl_target » Fri Oct 16, 2015 8:53 pm

Excellent points Pradeep.

Here is another view point on the whole Cecil debacle. It's already happening.
The Tree Hugging dimwits have scared away most of the hunters who would go to Africa now.

The photo guys who were supposed to pay the freight that hunters have traditionally been paying? They are few and far between now.
Due to the lack of funds to pay for adequate supervision, the animals are being slaughtered in record number and, of course, the media doesn't say boo about it beacuse... well....

Cecil the lion: What happens after the lynching?
Posted by Hannes Wessels on 5. August 2015

In the face of possibly the biggest media-inspired lynch mob in history let’s assume those millions who have reached a guilty verdict in the best traditions of mob-rule have their vengeance assuaged and the hangman has his way with the timeous dispatch of Bronkhorst, Palmer and Ndhlovu to the hell they so richly deserve. Screams of excitement will be followed by cheers and the arduous task of retribution for Cecil will have been completed. But what then? The reason I ask is I’m not sure where that leaves us and I speak for the aforementioned ‘mob’ in assuming they do really care about conservation because there remains some unfinished business and I’m anxious to know what their next move is now that the neck-stretching is done.

I would simply ask all those millions who recently spat vitriol and venom to work on the assumption that at the same time ‘Cecil’ was hunted and killed thousands of other wild animals across sub-Saharan Africa were writhing in excruciating pain as they died slow, unheralded deaths in wire snares. Many others were walking wounded having been shot with light calibre weapons, home-made shotguns and poisoned arrows.

Regrettably, in Africa, only a small portion of the remaining wildlife estate is policed with significant rigour. The rest is open to illegal hunting. Thousands of poachers kill far more prolifically and cruelly than Doctor Palmer every single day of the year. But the problem for the media attack-dogs is these crimes against nature don’t fit their beloved narrative; they are not easy targets and they are not wealthy Americans or portly Afrikaaners with beer-bellies, and so they are excused exposure or vilification. And because their conduct is so quickly forgiven by the media and their followers, there is little or no hope for wildlife in Africa. Believe me, if lynching Bronkhorst, Palmer and Ndhlovu provided a solution, I’d be bringing the rope but it does not. In fact it will exacerbate a dire situation.

The reason has been touched on above. Most parks and game areas are poorly protected. Africa is the home of atrocious governance, abuse of power and rampant corruption. Within these benighted countries many wildlife areas are not suitable for photographic tourism. There are a variety of reasons including security; some areas are within or on the fringes of conflict areas. Some do not have the volume of game or species- variety to make them attractive to conventional tourists and some are simply too difficult and expensive to access. It is these places that in most cases have no protection. The only people prepared to fill that void are the professional safari hunters. They in turn are the only people likely to provide the game any protection.

In my experience, most professional hunters care deeply about the game they hunt. And even if they don’t, they have a vested commercial interest in protecting the resource. The only way they can remain financially viable and engage in the prevention of uncontrolled slaughter is if people like Doctor Palmer go hunting and pay the big prices big game hunting demands. On the back of the ‘Cecil’ debacle, the future of safari hunting is bleak and sadly, so too is the future of wildlife.

In one such area my friend Darrell runs a privately owned estate. The elephant and much of the game in the adjacent national park have been almost wiped out by poachers. Much of that game has fled to his property seeking sanctuary. He’s fighting a lonely and dangerous battle to respond adequately. With few photographic tourists willing to visit him, his only means of breaking even is through running some carefully controlled hunting safaris which provide the money to soldier on. When the foreign hunters go, so will he, closely followed by the animals he risks his life to defend.

For those who actually want to do something other than make a noise there are no shortage of challenges. Chinese-sponsored gangs, well armed with heavy rifles and automatic weapons are presently killing elephant at an unprecedented rate. Recently, elephant-rich areas of Tanzania, Mozambique and Zambia have been all but wiped out. The demand for lion and leopard bones from the far-east is at an all-time high putting a premium on big cats. Meat hunters are rapidly reducing the antelope and buffalo herds throughout Africa. For many of these animals the safari-hunters were their only hope.

So my question to all the outraged loudmouths out there baying for the blood of sport-hunters I ask what happens when you have had your way? Once they are out the field can we expect you or your nominees to continue the fight to save what is left from the poaching scourge presently bedevilling this continent? They say actions speak louder than words so let’s see some real action! And if you can’t put up then shut up!

Article HERE


“Never give in, never give in, never; never; never; never – in nothing, great or small, large or petty – never give in except to convictions of honor and good sense” — Winston Churchill, Oct 29, 1941

pradeep2374
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Re: RE: Re: The killing of Cecil, the beloved lion!

Postby pradeep2374 » Sat Oct 17, 2015 3:49 pm

[url][URL][/url][ https://www.google.com.sg/url?sa=t&sour ... ckzO46Jx-g /URL]
xl_target wrote:Excellent points Pradeep.

Here is another view point on the whole Cecil debacle. It's already happening.
The Tree Hugging dimwits have scared away most of the hunters who would go to Africa now.

The photo guys who were supposed to pay the freight that hunters have traditionally been paying? They are few and far between now.
Due to the lack of funds to pay for adequate supervision, the animals are being slaughtered in record number and, of course, the media doesn't say boo about it beacuse... well....

Cecil the lion: What happens after the lynching?
Posted by Hannes Wessels on 5. August 2015

In the face of possibly the biggest media-inspired lynch mob in history let’s assume those millions who have reached a guilty verdict in the best traditions of mob-rule have their vengeance assuaged and the hangman has his way with the timeous dispatch of Bronkhorst, Palmer and Ndhlovu to the hell they so richly deserve. Screams of excitement will be followed by cheers and the arduous task of retribution for Cecil will have been completed. But what then? The reason I ask is I’m not sure where that leaves us and I speak for the aforementioned ‘mob’ in assuming they do really care about conservation because there remains some unfinished business and I’m anxious to know what their next move is now that the neck-stretching is done.

I would simply ask all those millions who recently spat vitriol and venom to work on the assumption that at the same time ‘Cecil’ was hunted and killed thousands of other wild animals across sub-Saharan Africa were writhing in excruciating pain as they died slow, unheralded deaths in wire snares. Many others were walking wounded having been shot with light calibre weapons, home-made shotguns and poisoned arrows.

Regrettably, in Africa, only a small portion of the remaining wildlife estate is policed with significant rigour. The rest is open to illegal hunting. Thousands of poachers kill far more prolifically and cruelly than Doctor Palmer every single day of the year. But the problem for the media attack-dogs is these crimes against nature don’t fit their beloved narrative; they are not easy targets and they are not wealthy Americans or portly Afrikaaners with beer-bellies, and so they are excused exposure or vilification. And because their conduct is so quickly forgiven by the media and their followers, there is little or no hope for wildlife in Africa. Believe me, if lynching Bronkhorst, Palmer and Ndhlovu provided a solution, I’d be bringing the rope but it does not. In fact it will exacerbate a dire situation.

The reason has been touched on above. Most parks and game areas are poorly protected. Africa is the home of atrocious governance, abuse of power and rampant corruption. Within these benighted countries many wildlife areas are not suitable for photographic tourism. There are a variety of reasons including security; some areas are within or on the fringes of conflict areas. Some do not have the volume of game or species- variety to make them attractive to conventional tourists and some are simply too difficult and expensive to access. It is these places that in most cases have no protection. The only people prepared to fill that void are the professional safari hunters. They in turn are the only people likely to provide the game any protection.

In my experience, most professional hunters care deeply about the game they hunt. And even if they don’t, they have a vested commercial interest in protecting the resource. The only way they can remain financially viable and engage in the prevention of uncontrolled slaughter is if people like Doctor Palmer go hunting and pay the big prices big game hunting demands. On the back of the ‘Cecil’ debacle, the future of safari hunting is bleak and sadly, so too is the future of wildlife.

In one such area my friend Darrell runs a privately owned estate. The elephant and much of the game in the adjacent national park have been almost wiped out by poachers. Much of that game has fled to his property seeking sanctuary. He’s fighting a lonely and dangerous battle to respond adequately. With few photographic tourists willing to visit him, his only means of breaking even is through running some carefully controlled hunting safaris which provide the money to soldier on. When the foreign hunters go, so will he, closely followed by the animals he risks his life to defend.

For those who actually want to do something other than make a noise there are no shortage of challenges. Chinese-sponsored gangs, well armed with heavy rifles and automatic weapons are presently killing elephant at an unprecedented rate. Recently, elephant-rich areas of Tanzania, Mozambique and Zambia have been all but wiped out. The demand for lion and leopard bones from the far-east is at an all-time high putting a premium on big cats. Meat hunters are rapidly reducing the antelope and buffalo herds throughout Africa. For many of these animals the safari-hunters were their only hope.

So my question to all the outraged loudmouths out there baying for the blood of sport-hunters I ask what happens when you have had your way? Once they are out the field can we expect you or your nominees to continue the fight to save what is left from the poaching scourge presently bedevilling this continent? They say actions speak louder than words so let’s see some real action! And if you can’t put up then shut up!

[url=http://africaunauthorised.com/?p=2370]Article HERE[/url]

Thank you, XL_TARGET, Intriguing indeed. 23 countries in Africa allow trophy hunting, infact South Africa earned about 100 M usd in 2006 through this. See the article below.
Screenshot_2015-10-17-17-57-07.png

xl_target wrote:Excellent points Pradeep.

Here is another view point on the whole Cecil debacle. It's already happening.
The Tree Hugging dimwits have scared away most of the hunters who would go to Africa now.

The photo guys who were supposed to pay the freight that hunters have traditionally been paying? They are few and far between now.
Due to the lack of funds to pay for adequate supervision, the animals are being slaughtered in record number and, of course, the media doesn't say boo about it beacuse... well....

Cecil the lion: What happens after the lynching?
Posted by Hannes Wessels on 5. August 2015

In the face of possibly the biggest media-inspired lynch mob in history let’s assume those millions who have reached a guilty verdict in the best traditions of mob-rule have their vengeance assuaged and the hangman has his way with the timeous dispatch of Bronkhorst, Palmer and Ndhlovu to the hell they so richly deserve. Screams of excitement will be followed by cheers and the arduous task of retribution for Cecil will have been completed. But what then? The reason I ask is I’m not sure where that leaves us and I speak for the aforementioned ‘mob’ in assuming they do really care about conservation because there remains some unfinished business and I’m anxious to know what their next move is now that the neck-stretching is done.

I would simply ask all those millions who recently spat vitriol and venom to work on the assumption that at the same time ‘Cecil’ was hunted and killed thousands of other wild animals across sub-Saharan Africa were writhing in excruciating pain as they died slow, unheralded deaths in wire snares. Many others were walking wounded having been shot with light calibre weapons, home-made shotguns and poisoned arrows.

Regrettably, in Africa, only a small portion of the remaining wildlife estate is policed with significant rigour. The rest is open to illegal hunting. Thousands of poachers kill far more prolifically and cruelly than Doctor Palmer every single day of the year. But the problem for the media attack-dogs is these crimes against nature don’t fit their beloved narrative; they are not easy targets and they are not wealthy Americans or portly Afrikaaners with beer-bellies, and so they are excused exposure or vilification. And because their conduct is so quickly forgiven by the media and their followers, there is little or no hope for wildlife in Africa. Believe me, if lynching Bronkhorst, Palmer and Ndhlovu provided a solution, I’d be bringing the rope but it does not. In fact it will exacerbate a dire situation.

The reason has been touched on above. Most parks and game areas are poorly protected. Africa is the home of atrocious governance, abuse of power and rampant corruption. Within these benighted countries many wildlife areas are not suitable for photographic tourism. There are a variety of reasons including security; some areas are within or on the fringes of conflict areas. Some do not have the volume of game or species- variety to make them attractive to conventional tourists and some are simply too difficult and expensive to access. It is these places that in most cases have no protection. The only people prepared to fill that void are the professional safari hunters. They in turn are the only people likely to provide the game any protection.

In my experience, most professional hunters care deeply about the game they hunt. And even if they don’t, they have a vested commercial interest in protecting the resource. The only way they can remain financially viable and engage in the prevention of uncontrolled slaughter is if people like Doctor Palmer go hunting and pay the big prices big game hunting demands. On the back of the ‘Cecil’ debacle, the future of safari hunting is bleak and sadly, so too is the future of wildlife.

In one such area my friend Darrell runs a privately owned estate. The elephant and much of the game in the adjacent national park have been almost wiped out by poachers. Much of that game has fled to his property seeking sanctuary. He’s fighting a lonely and dangerous battle to respond adequately. With few photographic tourists willing to visit him, his only means of breaking even is through running some carefully controlled hunting safaris which provide the money to soldier on. When the foreign hunters go, so will he, closely followed by the animals he risks his life to defend.

For those who actually want to do something other than make a noise there are no shortage of challenges. Chinese-sponsored gangs, well armed with heavy rifles and automatic weapons are presently killing elephant at an unprecedented rate. Recently, elephant-rich areas of Tanzania, Mozambique and Zambia have been all but wiped out. The demand for lion and leopard bones from the far-east is at an all-time high putting a premium on big cats. Meat hunters are rapidly reducing the antelope and buffalo herds throughout Africa. For many of these animals the safari-hunters were their only hope.

So my question to all the outraged loudmouths out there baying for the blood of sport-hunters I ask what happens when you have had your way? Once they are out the field can we expect you or your nominees to continue the fight to save what is left from the poaching scourge presently bedevilling this continent? They say actions speak louder than words so let’s see some real action! And if you can’t put up then shut up!

[url=http://africaunauthorised.com/?p=2370]Article HERE[/url]



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Added in 3 minutes 49 seconds:
xl_target wrote:Excellent points Pradeep.

Here is another view point on the whole Cecil debacle. It's already happening.
The Tree Hugging dimwits have scared away most of the hunters who would go to Africa now.

The photo guys who were supposed to pay the freight that hunters have traditionally been paying? They are few and far between now.
Due to the lack of funds to pay for adequate supervision, the animals are being slaughtered in record number and, of course, the media doesn't say boo about it beacuse... well....

Cecil the lion: What happens after the lynching?
Posted by Hannes Wessels on 5. August 2015

In the face of possibly the biggest media-inspired lynch mob in history let’s assume those millions who have reached a guilty verdict in the best traditions of mob-rule have their vengeance assuaged and the hangman has his way with the timeous dispatch of Bronkhorst, Palmer and Ndhlovu to the hell they so richly deserve. Screams of excitement will be followed by cheers and the arduous task of retribution for Cecil will have been completed. But what then? The reason I ask is I’m not sure where that leaves us and I speak for the aforementioned ‘mob’ in assuming they do really care about conservation because there remains some unfinished business and I’m anxious to know what their next move is now that the neck-stretching is done.

I would simply ask all those millions who recently spat vitriol and venom to work on the assumption that at the same time ‘Cecil’ was hunted and killed thousands of other wild animals across sub-Saharan Africa were writhing in excruciating pain as they died slow, unheralded deaths in wire snares. Many others were walking wounded having been shot with light calibre weapons, home-made shotguns and poisoned arrows.

Regrettably, in Africa, only a small portion of the remaining wildlife estate is policed with significant rigour. The rest is open to illegal hunting. Thousands of poachers kill far more prolifically and cruelly than Doctor Palmer every single day of the year. But the problem for the media attack-dogs is these crimes against nature don’t fit their beloved narrative; they are not easy targets and they are not wealthy Americans or portly Afrikaaners with beer-bellies, and so they are excused exposure or vilification. And because their conduct is so quickly forgiven by the media and their followers, there is little or no hope for wildlife in Africa. Believe me, if lynching Bronkhorst, Palmer and Ndhlovu provided a solution, I’d be bringing the rope but it does not. In fact it will exacerbate a dire situation.

The reason has been touched on above. Most parks and game areas are poorly protected. Africa is the home of atrocious governance, abuse of power and rampant corruption. Within these benighted countries many wildlife areas are not suitable for photographic tourism. There are a variety of reasons including security; some areas are within or on the fringes of conflict areas. Some do not have the volume of game or species- variety to make them attractive to conventional tourists and some are simply too difficult and expensive to access. It is these places that in most cases have no protection. The only people prepared to fill that void are the professional safari hunters. They in turn are the only people likely to provide the game any protection.

In my experience, most professional hunters care deeply about the game they hunt. And even if they don’t, they have a vested commercial interest in protecting the resource. The only way they can remain financially viable and engage in the prevention of uncontrolled slaughter is if people like Doctor Palmer go hunting and pay the big prices big game hunting demands. On the back of the ‘Cecil’ debacle, the future of safari hunting is bleak and sadly, so too is the future of wildlife.

In one such area my friend Darrell runs a privately owned estate. The elephant and much of the game in the adjacent national park have been almost wiped out by poachers. Much of that game has fled to his property seeking sanctuary. He’s fighting a lonely and dangerous battle to respond adequately. With few photographic tourists willing to visit him, his only means of breaking even is through running some carefully controlled hunting safaris which provide the money to soldier on. When the foreign hunters go, so will he, closely followed by the animals he risks his life to defend.

For those who actually want to do something other than make a noise there are no shortage of challenges. Chinese-sponsored gangs, well armed with heavy rifles and automatic weapons are presently killing elephant at an unprecedented rate. Recently, elephant-rich areas of Tanzania, Mozambique and Zambia have been all but wiped out. The demand for lion and leopard bones from the far-east is at an all-time high putting a premium on big cats. Meat hunters are rapidly reducing the antelope and buffalo herds throughout Africa. For many of these animals the safari-hunters were their only hope.

So my question to all the outraged loudmouths out there baying for the blood of sport-hunters I ask what happens when you have had your way? Once they are out the field can we expect you or your nominees to continue the fight to save what is left from the poaching scourge presently bedevilling this continent? They say actions speak louder than words so let’s see some real action! And if you can’t put up then shut up!

[url=http://africaunauthorised.com/?p=2370]Article HERE[/url]

Thank you, XL_TARGET, Intriguing indeed. 23 countries in Africa allow trophy hunting, infact South Africa earned about 100 M usd in 2006 through this. See the article below.
Screenshot_2015-10-17-17-57-07.png


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pradeep2374
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Location: Singapore, Pondicherry
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Re: RE: Re: The killing of Cecil, the beloved lion!

Postby pradeep2374 » Sat Oct 17, 2015 3:49 pm

xl_target wrote:Excellent points Pradeep.

Here is another view point on the whole Cecil debacle. It's already happening.
The Tree Hugging dimwits have scared away most of the hunters who would go to Africa now.

The photo guys who were supposed to pay the freight that hunters have traditionally been paying? They are few and far between now.
Due to the lack of funds to pay for adequate supervision, the animals are being slaughtered in record number and, of course, the media doesn't say boo about it beacuse... well....

Cecil the lion: What happens after the lynching?
Posted by Hannes Wessels on 5. August 2015

In the face of possibly the biggest media-inspired lynch mob in history let’s assume those millions who have reached a guilty verdict in the best traditions of mob-rule have their vengeance assuaged and the hangman has his way with the timeous dispatch of Bronkhorst, Palmer and Ndhlovu to the hell they so richly deserve. Screams of excitement will be followed by cheers and the arduous task of retribution for Cecil will have been completed. But what then? The reason I ask is I’m not sure where that leaves us and I speak for the aforementioned ‘mob’ in assuming they do really care about conservation because there remains some unfinished business and I’m anxious to know what their next move is now that the neck-stretching is done.

I would simply ask all those millions who recently spat vitriol and venom to work on the assumption that at the same time ‘Cecil’ was hunted and killed thousands of other wild animals across sub-Saharan Africa were writhing in excruciating pain as they died slow, unheralded deaths in wire snares. Many others were walking wounded having been shot with light calibre weapons, home-made shotguns and poisoned arrows.

Regrettably, in Africa, only a small portion of the remaining wildlife estate is policed with significant rigour. The rest is open to illegal hunting. Thousands of poachers kill far more prolifically and cruelly than Doctor Palmer every single day of the year. But the problem for the media attack-dogs is these crimes against nature don’t fit their beloved narrative; they are not easy targets and they are not wealthy Americans or portly Afrikaaners with beer-bellies, and so they are excused exposure or vilification. And because their conduct is so quickly forgiven by the media and their followers, there is little or no hope for wildlife in Africa. Believe me, if lynching Bronkhorst, Palmer and Ndhlovu provided a solution, I’d be bringing the rope but it does not. In fact it will exacerbate a dire situation.

The reason has been touched on above. Most parks and game areas are poorly protected. Africa is the home of atrocious governance, abuse of power and rampant corruption. Within these benighted countries many wildlife areas are not suitable for photographic tourism. There are a variety of reasons including security; some areas are within or on the fringes of conflict areas. Some do not have the volume of game or species- variety to make them attractive to conventional tourists and some are simply too difficult and expensive to access. It is these places that in most cases have no protection. The only people prepared to fill that void are the professional safari hunters. They in turn are the only people likely to provide the game any protection.

In my experience, most professional hunters care deeply about the game they hunt. And even if they don’t, they have a vested commercial interest in protecting the resource. The only way they can remain financially viable and engage in the prevention of uncontrolled slaughter is if people like Doctor Palmer go hunting and pay the big prices big game hunting demands. On the back of the ‘Cecil’ debacle, the future of safari hunting is bleak and sadly, so too is the future of wildlife.

In one such area my friend Darrell runs a privately owned estate. The elephant and much of the game in the adjacent national park have been almost wiped out by poachers. Much of that game has fled to his property seeking sanctuary. He’s fighting a lonely and dangerous battle to respond adequately. With few photographic tourists willing to visit him, his only means of breaking even is through running some carefully controlled hunting safaris which provide the money to soldier on. When the foreign hunters go, so will he, closely followed by the animals he risks his life to defend.

For those who actually want to do something other than make a noise there are no shortage of challenges. Chinese-sponsored gangs, well armed with heavy rifles and automatic weapons are presently killing elephant at an unprecedented rate. Recently, elephant-rich areas of Tanzania, Mozambique and Zambia have been all but wiped out. The demand for lion and leopard bones from the far-east is at an all-time high putting a premium on big cats. Meat hunters are rapidly reducing the antelope and buffalo herds throughout Africa. For many of these animals the safari-hunters were their only hope.

So my question to all the outraged loudmouths out there baying for the blood of sport-hunters I ask what happens when you have had your way? Once they are out the field can we expect you or your nominees to continue the fight to save what is left from the poaching scourge presently bedevilling this continent? They say actions speak louder than words so let’s see some real action! And if you can’t put up then shut up!

[url=http://africaunauthorised.com/?p=2370]Article HERE[/url]

Thank you, XL_TARGET, Intriguing indeed. 23 countries in Africa allow trophy hunting, infact South Africa earned about 100 M usd in 2006 through this. See the article below.
Screenshot_2015-10-17-17-57-07.png


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SMJ
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Re: The killing of Cecil, the beloved lion!

Postby SMJ » Sat Oct 17, 2015 8:17 pm

There was an article a while back (a month or a couple of months ago) in the Times of India, Bombay regarding Trophy hunting obviously with a focus on Cecil. The biggest point that the article drove home was that the LOCALS who still see lions as pests (in terms of cattle raiding or man eating) were interested in conserving them ONLY because trophy hunting brought money! If there is a ban, there is bound to be a drastic reduction in population of ALL wildlife...so yeah I totally agree that a BAN will most certainly make things worse...



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Re: The killing of Cecil, the beloved lion!

Postby ckkalyan » Wed Oct 21, 2015 3:22 pm

Dr. Walter Palmer Vindicated in Cecil the Lion Witch Hunt
Posted on October 16, 2015 by Dean Weingarten

Dentist Won’t Be Charged In Zimbabwe Over Cecil The Lion’s Death - read more here!


When guns are outlawed, only outlaws will have guns!

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shooter
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Re: The killing of Cecil, the beloved lion!

Postby shooter » Sat Feb 13, 2016 4:29 pm

I oppose any one with the opinion that people who kill animals for pleasure are in the same league as terrorists.

Same for the people equating hunting with machismo.

For these peoples information many many millions people's opinion is similar for gun owners. Ur they are terrorists or that they are trying to prove their machismo.

There are very few things that give me as much pleasure as hunting. If that makes you think it makes me a terrorist then so be it. If it makes you think I am doing it to prove my machismo then so be it.

As long as it is legal and done in the context of a management plan I will do it ( if within my reach and budget). Whether it is lion elephant walrus whatever.
You don't have to do it in fact I pray all hunters on earth except me start finding these animals majestic and stop hunting them. That way I can do it more.
Majestic is a very subjective term. The shooting of the red stag by a hunter in the UK caused a lot of furore. As a deer was such a majestic animal. This also means that the less majestic , the more right to kill them?????

And who defines majestic? You? Me? If I say I find wheat plant majestic will you ban roti? Or stop eating it? I find goat and sheep majestic will you stop eating.

One thing I disagree with is xl targets comment about pure vegeterians etc. I disagree. The most hypocritical lying people I have known on earth are vegeterians. The "purer" the more lying and hypocritical.

Despite these flaws we tolerate them so the least they can do is support our cause.

Leftist liberal bunny hugger gun grabber cookie cutter antis will never listen to reason and will always impose their views on others.

over here in the UK we have had enough from the anti hunting brigade.
A guy was injured shooting grouse and air ambulance had to save him. Thousands of people wrote on social media and newspapers wishing he dies and how their tax money should not be used to save these "terrorists" .
In theses people's eyes a grouse is a more "majestic" bird more than human life.

And while we are talking about personal opinions here are my two cents:

Plants are living beings and feel pain. They have few senses less than humans like taste sight smell hearing. People who can kill them for food are the same kind of people who can murder a deaf blind comatose person.


People who have guns but don't agree with hunting and are on Ifg and voice anti hunting opinions in posts are trying to make up for missing anatomical organs and have learning disability.

None of the above opinions aw backed by any logic but are my opinions. Same as theirs but I am admitting I don't have a logic to back this up.

I can voice more "opinions" but in short, on the behalf of the whole hunting community all I am saying is
"S**** anti hunters. Don't tread on us"

note: s****=Salam


You want more gun control? Use both hands!

God made man and God made woman, but Samuel Colt made them equal.

One does not hunt in order to kill; on the contrary, one kills in order to have hunted. by Jose Gasset.


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Chengy
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Jul 28, 2015 11:56 am

Re: The killing of Cecil, the beloved lion!

Postby Chengy » Sat Feb 13, 2016 11:37 pm

SMJ I have very fond memories of "Chital Walk" . Its very sad to hear about the passing away of Mark. Spent many a days sitting in his verandah and watching the animals come to the salt lick on his property. May his soul R.I.P



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essdee1972
Posts: 1193
Joined: Fri Oct 01, 2010 5:54 pm
Location: Mumbai, Maharashtra

Re: The killing of Cecil, the beloved lion!

Postby essdee1972 » Wed Feb 17, 2016 1:21 pm

Here's what Ol' Teddy (Theodore Roosevelt) had to say on the subject:

In hunting, the finding and killing of game is after all but a part of the whole. The free, self-reliant, adventurous life, with its rugged and stalwart democracy, the wild surroundings, the grand beauty of the scenery, the chance to study the ways and habits of the woodland creatures-all these unite to give to the career of the wilderness hunter its peculiar charm. The chase is among the best of all national pastimes; it cultivates that vigorous manliness for the lack of which in a nation, as in an individual, the possession of no other qualities can possibly atone.

-Theodore Roosevelt


Note:

it cultivates that vigorous manliness for the lack of which in a nation, as in an individual, the possession of no other qualities can possibly atone.

This was a guy who, being born a sickly child, worked himself up to a standard of toughness very few men with such busy lives could achieve. In his 70's the old guy goes exploring an unknown Brazilian river, and nearly leaves his bones there!


Cheers!

EssDee
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________
In a polity, each citizen is to possess his own arms, which are not supplied or owned by the state.Aristotle

Get up, stand up, Stand up for your rights. Get up, stand up, Don't give up the fight.Bob Marley

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Hammerhead
Posts: 585
Joined: Thu Aug 04, 2011 6:52 am
Location: Toronto

Re: The killing of Cecil, the beloved lion!

Postby Hammerhead » Wed Feb 24, 2016 9:06 am

Back when this whole Cecil the Lion sh!^show was playing out in the media, many of those who knew anything about hunting in Africa pointed out that this would be one of the likely consequences. The corrupt Zimbabwean government utterly screwed themselves by throwing Palmer under the bus, and now any hunter with half a brain is spending their money elsewhere. The Zimbabweans will lose a spectacular amount of money in trophy fees and concession leases because of their actions. - Haji



Zimbabwe park warns it may shoot 200 ‘surplus’ lions now that big game hunters are staying home

http://news.nationalpost.com/news/world ... aying-home


Go figure, who is sad now !!!


The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing. - Edmund Burke

ngrewal
Posts: 2920
Joined: Wed May 31, 2006 7:28 pm
Location: US

Re: The killing of Cecil, the beloved lion!

Postby ngrewal » Tue Mar 08, 2016 5:08 am

Zimbawe is another country gine bad due to the leadership..Lions are just another victims they ruined everything else economy etc no aw in the land. Mugambe is 92 years old and still no giving up ...amazing aint it
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