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Suggestions for Self defence Tool For Outdoors & Home ?

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harshit89
Posts: 175
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2014 2:16 pm
Location: Delhi

Suggestions for Self defence Tool For Outdoors & Home ?

Postby harshit89 » Thu Jun 25, 2015 11:55 am

There is always be a conflict between the various self defence tool which can be used for outdoors. Some say that there hands are enough to deal with any threat, but that is no practical. Some carry gun, some carry knives and some traditional people sticks(known as laddi or baton). I was thinking that would these be good both for outdoors or at home as well.
Want good suggestions on the best self defence tools which can be used for Outdoors and at home as well.


Keep knives in your pocket and pray that you will never need it

aadhaulya
Posts: 1174
Joined: Wed Nov 20, 2013 10:41 pm

Re: Suggestions for Self defence Tool For Outdoors & Home ?

Postby aadhaulya » Thu Jun 25, 2015 12:09 pm

Hand gun for outdoors and shotgun for home. If you want only one then hand gun.

Regards

Atul



User avatar
xl_target
Posts: 3406
Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2009 7:47 am
Location: USA

Re: Suggestions for Self defence Tool For Outdoors & Home ?

Postby xl_target » Thu Jun 25, 2015 9:33 pm

Want good suggestions on the best self defence tools which can be used for Outdoors and at home as well.


Self Defense tool? I think this is it:

Image

I'm not just being flippant. The ideal way is to avoid trouble in the first place.

You can do that by being aware of your surroundings at all times, anticipating trouble and avoiding.
Being aware; having good situational awareness, all the time, can be a surprisingly difficult thing to achieve.
You will have to consciously practice it till you do it all the time.

Some tips from here:
As I mentioned, Situational Awareness is the most important survival skill you can have. Whether you own this skill or could use some help building it, here are some things you can do to practice situational awareness. Pick the ones that work for you and practice them as much as you can.
The best way that I can think of to practice this skill is using the Coopers Color Code any and every time you are away from your home.

If you are attacked, it will often come from behind you. Check your six, or look behind you frequently. This is a hard one to get used to, partly because there can be so much to scan in front of you, that looking behind you just doesn’t occur to you. Think of how often you are supposed to check your mirrors while driving; every 5-8 seconds is recommended. Since walking is a much slower pace, I think checking your six every 30 seconds is sufficient. I walk maybe 100 yards in the parking garage at work and I often check my six twice.

When you are in public, do not use your smartphone or text-message, if at all possible. There have been muggings where the smartphone was violently taken. If you are paying attention to your screen, you are not paying attention to your surroundings.

When you’re in public and having a conversation, keep your eyes moving at all times. It’s easy to become hyper-focused on a conversation. I worked security at a local high school and watched a teenage boy who was involved in a conversation, walk into oncoming traffic and get hit by a car. In shock, he got up and tried to walk away, we stopped him and called an ambulance. I wonder if he learned as much as I did from the experience.

It’s easy to get sucked into what you’re doing at work. Because workplace violence is so prevalent, I try to listen to what is going on around me, especially when there is a sound that doesn’t fit. Just because I have seen this person every work day for the last five years, doesn’t mean that he isn’t capable of violence in the work place.

When we go out to eat, I prefer to have my back to a wall, and always sit facing the door. I continuously scan the room and everyone that comes in the door.

When you go somewhere, pay attention to the way you’re going. Notice alternate exits and keep track of the fastest way out. This will help ensure that you know how to get back the way you came and give you the closest exit in the event of an emergency of any kind.

There is a phrase in the Navy that I’ll never forget, “Keep your head on a swivel”. I worked the flight deck at night for two cruises in the Persian Gulf. It’s often been rated as one of the top 10 most dangerous jobs in the world and for good reason. There are literally dozens of things that could kill or maim you on all sides, including above and below. You can’t focus on one thing for long. You have to keep looking around to make sure nothing is headed your direction. I’ve been out of the Navy a long time. Even though I’m not on the flight deck anymore, I still try to keep my head on a swivel.

Look up and down; make sure you are looking up for possible dangers as well as down. I once read on a forum about a man who climbed up a tree on a fairly popular hiking path. His feet were a few feet above people’s heads. He said he was up there for a good while and not one person noticed him. I have no proof but I think most people look mostly at things at their eye level, unless something obvious draws their attention somewhere else.

As I mentioned in the article I wrote on Situational Awareness, your gut or intuition or even the Holy Spirit can alert you. You might not even be conscious of why you’re on alert. Women have a much easier time with this than us guys. Pay attention to your gut; if you have a feeling that you should take an alternate route home, do it.

If you have an uneasy feeling about someone that just walked into your business or church, keep an eye on them. Trust your gut.


and from here:
5 Tips to Improve Your Situational Awareness

September 11, 2012 by James Leave a Comment
5 tips to improve situational awarenessAs a law enforcement officer, situational awareness is crucial to my job. I’ve found that the more you interact with people the more you are able to hone in your situational awareness skills. But, what is situational awareness and how does it apply to me? A simple definition for situational awareness is simply knowing what is happening around you. Not only is having a higher level of situational awareness going to increase your chances of survival in an emergency situation, it’s also applicable to everyday situations. Here are five simple techniques for improving your situational awareness.

1. Be mindful of those around you. For example, when you are at a store (especially if you are purchasing something of high value) keep an eye out for who is in line behind you and the row on your left and right. If someone close to you watches you purchase an expensive camera or laptop, they might be willing to follow you right out into the parking lot and take it. Work on remembering faces and what people are wearing, especially if the person is wearing something unusual for the situation (e.g., a coat in the summer). As you go to your car, have your keyless entry remote in your hand — not only to unlock the door more swiftly, but to hit the panic button if needed.

2. Sit in areas that allow you to watch others. When sitting in a large area like a restaurant, classroom, or movie theater, sit in the back if possible. Not only does this make it easier to watch everyone that comes and goes in and out of the room, this will just about guarantee that you will be close to an exit. At a restaurant, for example, if SHTF, you can escape through the rear exit or through the kitchen. Nearly all restaurants have an exit near the kitchen due to management not wanting employees walking through the eating area to go on breaks. A related point: Be aware of all the exits in the building.

3. Listen to people. I use this one all the time. Listen to conversations going on around you. If someone is loud, extremely upset, or angry, then S may HTF. If someone is talking about something sketchy (e.g., drugs), that person could be a threat to your safety.

4. Be aware. Don’t get too occupied with your smartphones or cell phones. Every day I see people walking down streets or sidewalks, or driving while playing on their phones. I know that checking your phone can be addictive, but when you’re focused on your phone, that means you’re not focused on your purse, your children, or your general safety and well-being.

5. Don’t underestimate anyone. Acknowledge that even though most people around you don’t want to do you harm, that nearly anyone could be a threat. Watch over yourself and your family as if your lives depend on it. If Johnny “Toad” (nickname for any thug) sees you watching him diligently, he will most like pass on making you his victim and will more than likely leave the area because he knows that he has been seen.

My friends, there are many more tips on situational awareness, but these are a good start. These are the primary tips I remind my wife of constantly because they are easy to implement. Do these things and you are already more aware than most of the population.

Be Diligent,

James


Guns, Knives, Lahtis, whatever, are the tools of last resort.
You usually have to resort to them because you have failed to anticipate the trouble that was coming your way (for whatever reason).
You can avoid using them if you can avoid the trouble in the first place.
You can avoid trouble if you can anticipate or see it coming your way.
You can only do that if you are fully aware of your surroundings.

Sometimes, however, no matter what you do, trouble is going to come looking for you.
Then it sure is good to have the firearm, knife or lahti.
Remember that anything can be used as a self defence tool; a rock, sand thrown in the eyes, a tree branch, etc.


“Never give in, never give in, never; never; never; never – in nothing, great or small, large or petty – never give in except to convictions of honor and good sense” — Winston Churchill, Oct 29, 1941


harshit89
Posts: 175
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2014 2:16 pm
Location: Delhi

Re: Suggestions for Self defence Tool For Outdoors & Home ?

Postby harshit89 » Mon Jun 29, 2015 2:28 pm

aadhaulya wrote:Hand gun for outdoors and shotgun for home. If you want only one then hand gun.

Regards

Atul


Seems to be a good option...


Keep knives in your pocket and pray that you will never need it

harshit89
Posts: 175
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2014 2:16 pm
Location: Delhi

Re: Suggestions for Self defence Tool For Outdoors & Home ?

Postby harshit89 » Mon Jun 29, 2015 2:31 pm

xl_target wrote:
Want good suggestions on the best self defence tools which can be used for Outdoors and at home as well.


Self Defense tool? I think this is it:

[ Image ]

I'm not just being flippant. The ideal way is to avoid trouble in the first place.

You can do that by being aware of your surroundings at all times, anticipating trouble and avoiding.
Being aware; having good situational awareness, all the time, can be a surprisingly difficult thing to achieve.
You will have to consciously practice it till you do it all the time.

Some tips from here:
As I mentioned, Situational Awareness is the most important survival skill you can have. Whether you own this skill or could use some help building it, here are some things you can do to practice situational awareness. Pick the ones that work for you and practice them as much as you can.
The best way that I can think of to practice this skill is using the Coopers Color Code any and every time you are away from your home.

If you are attacked, it will often come from behind you. Check your six, or look behind you frequently. This is a hard one to get used to, partly because there can be so much to scan in front of you, that looking behind you just doesn’t occur to you. Think of how often you are supposed to check your mirrors while driving; every 5-8 seconds is recommended. Since walking is a much slower pace, I think checking your six every 30 seconds is sufficient. I walk maybe 100 yards in the parking garage at work and I often check my six twice.

When you are in public, do not use your smartphone or text-message, if at all possible. There have been muggings where the smartphone was violently taken. If you are paying attention to your screen, you are not paying attention to your surroundings.

When you’re in public and having a conversation, keep your eyes moving at all times. It’s easy to become hyper-focused on a conversation. I worked security at a local high school and watched a teenage boy who was involved in a conversation, walk into oncoming traffic and get hit by a car. In shock, he got up and tried to walk away, we stopped him and called an ambulance. I wonder if he learned as much as I did from the experience.

It’s easy to get sucked into what you’re doing at work. Because workplace violence is so prevalent, I try to listen to what is going on around me, especially when there is a sound that doesn’t fit. Just because I have seen this person every work day for the last five years, doesn’t mean that he isn’t capable of violence in the work place.

When we go out to eat, I prefer to have my back to a wall, and always sit facing the door. I continuously scan the room and everyone that comes in the door.

When you go somewhere, pay attention to the way you’re going. Notice alternate exits and keep track of the fastest way out. This will help ensure that you know how to get back the way you came and give you the closest exit in the event of an emergency of any kind.

There is a phrase in the Navy that I’ll never forget, “Keep your head on a swivel”. I worked the flight deck at night for two cruises in the Persian Gulf. It’s often been rated as one of the top 10 most dangerous jobs in the world and for good reason. There are literally dozens of things that could kill or maim you on all sides, including above and below. You can’t focus on one thing for long. You have to keep looking around to make sure nothing is headed your direction. I’ve been out of the Navy a long time. Even though I’m not on the flight deck anymore, I still try to keep my head on a swivel.

Look up and down; make sure you are looking up for possible dangers as well as down. I once read on a forum about a man who climbed up a tree on a fairly popular hiking path. His feet were a few feet above people’s heads. He said he was up there for a good while and not one person noticed him. I have no proof but I think most people look mostly at things at their eye level, unless something obvious draws their attention somewhere else.

As I mentioned in the article I wrote on Situational Awareness, your gut or intuition or even the Holy Spirit can alert you. You might not even be conscious of why you’re on alert. Women have a much easier time with this than us guys. Pay attention to your gut; if you have a feeling that you should take an alternate route home, do it.

If you have an uneasy feeling about someone that just walked into your business or church, keep an eye on them. Trust your gut.


and from here:
5 Tips to Improve Your Situational Awareness

September 11, 2012 by James Leave a Comment
5 tips to improve situational awarenessAs a law enforcement officer, situational awareness is crucial to my job. I’ve found that the more you interact with people the more you are able to hone in your situational awareness skills. But, what is situational awareness and how does it apply to me? A simple definition for situational awareness is simply knowing what is happening around you. Not only is having a higher level of situational awareness going to increase your chances of survival in an emergency situation, it’s also applicable to everyday situations. Here are five simple techniques for improving your situational awareness.

1. Be mindful of those around you. For example, when you are at a store (especially if you are purchasing something of high value) keep an eye out for who is in line behind you and the row on your left and right. If someone close to you watches you purchase an expensive camera or laptop, they might be willing to follow you right out into the parking lot and take it. Work on remembering faces and what people are wearing, especially if the person is wearing something unusual for the situation (e.g., a coat in the summer). As you go to your car, have your keyless entry remote in your hand — not only to unlock the door more swiftly, but to hit the panic button if needed.

2. Sit in areas that allow you to watch others. When sitting in a large area like a restaurant, classroom, or movie theater, sit in the back if possible. Not only does this make it easier to watch everyone that comes and goes in and out of the room, this will just about guarantee that you will be close to an exit. At a restaurant, for example, if SHTF, you can escape through the rear exit or through the kitchen. Nearly all restaurants have an exit near the kitchen due to management not wanting employees walking through the eating area to go on breaks. A related point: Be aware of all the exits in the building.

3. Listen to people. I use this one all the time. Listen to conversations going on around you. If someone is loud, extremely upset, or angry, then S may HTF. If someone is talking about something sketchy (e.g., drugs), that person could be a threat to your safety.

4. Be aware. Don’t get too occupied with your smartphones or cell phones. Every day I see people walking down streets or sidewalks, or driving while playing on their phones. I know that checking your phone can be addictive, but when you’re focused on your phone, that means you’re not focused on your purse, your children, or your general safety and well-being.

5. Don’t underestimate anyone. Acknowledge that even though most people around you don’t want to do you harm, that nearly anyone could be a threat. Watch over yourself and your family as if your lives depend on it. If Johnny “Toad” (nickname for any thug) sees you watching him diligently, he will most like pass on making you his victim and will more than likely leave the area because he knows that he has been seen.

My friends, there are many more tips on situational awareness, but these are a good start. These are the primary tips I remind my wife of constantly because they are easy to implement. Do these things and you are already more aware than most of the population.

Be Diligent,

James


Guns, Knives, Lahtis, whatever, are the tools of last resort.
You usually have to resort to them because you have failed to anticipate the trouble that was coming your way (for whatever reason).
You can avoid using them if you can avoid the trouble in the first place.
You can avoid trouble if you can anticipate or see it coming your way.
You can only do that if you are fully aware of your surroundings.

Sometimes, however, no matter what you do, trouble is going to come looking for you.
Then it sure is good to have the firearm, knife or lahti.
Remember that anything can be used as a self defence tool; a rock, sand thrown in the eyes, a tree branch, etc.



That is what I was looking for....
Perfect!!!!!


Keep knives in your pocket and pray that you will never need it

aadhaulya
Posts: 1174
Joined: Wed Nov 20, 2013 10:41 pm

Re: Suggestions for Self defence Tool For Outdoors & Home ?

Postby aadhaulya » Tue Jun 30, 2015 3:14 am

harshit89 wrote:That is what I was looking for....
Perfect!!!!!


Good idea. You don't even need a License and cops can't harass you.

Regards

Atul




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